Monthly Archives: February 2017

Questions to Develop your Characters Background

Here are some questions to think about when creating a new character. This is not an exhaustive list or character sheet, merely something to get you thinking. It’s primarily focused on their past with a little bit of current situation mixed in. I hope you find it helpful!

Name:

Age:

Where they currently live:

What is the greater area around their home: (city, country etc.)

What they do for a living: (year in school also counts)

Previous homes: (or else why have they never moved)

Why did they move: (or where would they like to move)

How are they feeling at this time:

Who is their father: (specify their job)

Who is their mother: (specify their job)

Siblings: (or how being an only child has affected them)

Family relationship:

How was their relationship to their family before:

How old were their parents when they were born:

What was some advice they learned from their parents: (Relationships, work, life etc.)

What was their education:

What kind of college: (or why didn’t they go to one)

What were two defining moments in their life:

When they were little, what did they want to be when they grew up:

Do they have many friends and what is their relationship to them:

 

I hope there was at least one question on here you haven’t thought of before and that it helped you in some way. Good luck!

How I Write Lovable Characters

Here are my experiences and how I write characters I love as well as the mistakes I’ve made. I hope this helps in some way and Happy Valentines Day!

I’ve written many different stories with many different narrators and I know a good narrator will keep me writing. The very first book I tried to write featured a main character who had no faults. I originally thought that this would make the character so much better but as I tried to write it, I started hating the character more and more. It seemed impossible for me to relate to the character and made all the tension dissipate before there was really any action.

        So I abandoned that project and started on another one. This time I was sure to give my character actual human characteristics and flaws. In fact, my main character was enemy number one when it came to the world she lived in but was the hero as far as the book went. This book actually got completed but I kept reworking it. 12 drafts later I was making the character more empathetic and less cold towards everyone. So I learned that even if a character is evil they still have to be likable.

        Not too much later I started writing a character who had lost their memory. This is when I first noticed that half of a character was just what motivated him. It didn’t even need to be on the page as long as I knew what past thing the character had that was affecting the way he reacted now. That is to say, my character was passive and dull because there was nothing motivating his actions. I ended up not writing the most interesting parts of the story because I couldn’t imagine why the character was doing what was supposed to happen.

        Not long after that, I finally started writing characters who the readers enjoyed and who helped push the plot forward. The secret to these characters was giving them emotion and reason. They were no longer a puppet with one general concept making them up but were dynamic and relatable. Sometimes these characters would change to plot just because they started moving on their own.

From then on I started building my characters from the emotion up. I’d begun a book by thinking of a situation that would cause a highly emotional response and then create the two characters who would react in the most interesting way in response to said stimuli. Before even writing the story I’d come up with past events, fears, things they hated. By fleshing them out in every aspect I could, I could understand them better and relate to them more.

Another thing I found key was to make characters have strong beliefs. If a character wasn’t either super outgoing or super shy then they were boring. But if I worked with a shy character and put them in situations where they had to be outgoing, that was interesting. I listened to what others said about why characters were good or bad and I found some interesting distinctions. Characters who were emotionally not ready to take on the climax often came across as overly dramatic and a scaredy cat. Their counterparts who were held back by past memories were perceived as strong and compelling.

The thing that makes a character seem the most alive to me then, is responding to the plot in consistent ways that are unique to the character. If they respond differently every time then I can’t relate to or understand the character. If they respond the same way as everyone else the fall flat and become boring, unoriginal, and paper thin. It is their responses that keep the plot engaging and moving forward.

5 Writer’s Block Busters

I can distinctly remember one time when I desperately wanted to write but I had such bad writer’s block I couldn’t do anything but google how to get rid of it. This is a list for my past self and I hope it helps you too.

Change your place and state of mind

We have to tracts of mind, scientists say, one it the ‘focus’ mind that we engage when we are learning, listening and processing information. The other one is more of a daydreaming state where ideas flow to you. You’re in this state of mind while showering or driving, the thoughts just flow and you don’t try to censor them. So try to get out and doing something boring so your creative mind will kick into gear.

DELETE

The first time I heard this one I cringed and clicked away. This doesn’t mean get rid of forever, just move the past few sentences to another document and try again. Starting a paragraph back or even just a sentence has always worked for me.

Write about pineapples

If you just read that and thought ‘what the heck?’ then you’re like me. This was the thing that cured my writer’s block that fateful day. Now when I got this tip from who knows where, they meant, open a new page and get the juices flowing. At the time I just had my characters talk about pineapples. It got me into voice and away from the situation I was stuck at.

Write a later scene

This one is dangerous but it works. If you can’t write where you are any more then jump ahead to a scene you want to write. Be careful, though, I’ve had entire books finished with one or two spots and when I went to fill them in, accidentally changed the ending.

Get Busy.

Truth be told, I hate this one but I know it works. I’ve been told that inspiration never finds those who wait. If you do something else like read or draw or play music, anything to get creative, it should get you up and motivated to write!

 

I hope something here caused sparks that got you ready to write. Oh and if you’re here procrastinating on actually working… Get To Work!

Have a nice day!