Posted in Publishing

The publishers spreadsheet

So you want to get published and you’re doing your research; good for you! I just wanted to give you a quick simple guide to lay out information about all the publishers you’ve been collecting emails for.

When I was first trying to figure out who to submit to my list of 35 people who accepted un-agented, open submission, LGBT works was pretty daunting. So I spoke with a published author about how he chose the first person to apply to and this was his best tip.

The publisher spreadsheet.

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As you can see here it’s a pretty simple list. Name, website and what they need to have sent in the submission and if I submitted. This makes it easy to sift through. The requirements were often taken right from their pages so I didn’t even have to write it out.

If you don’t think you want to take the time to do this. Just think about the next time you’re submitting your next novel and need to look through every publisher again (and the only thing you’ve saved is there names.)

This is really easy to add too if you have another variable such as if they already responded or if you’re waiting for a response. You can also see one name floating in the middle… that collum was supposed to be for the names at the top of the query but several had just one editor to submit too.

I hope this helps you organize your life and makes the stress a little less heavy. I also fully recommend this book to anyone looking to publish any kind of writing.

 

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Posted in Writing

Why Writers Need a Three Color Notebook

My most trusted notebook has three different colored pages, and it is my most valuable writing tool. Pink, purple, and blue each represent something very specific and it keeps my writing crisp and fresh. It is my most valuable guide, character developer, plot generator and the one thing I used to write all three of my novels.

The Blue Pages: Characters

In the very front of my book is a list of character traits I like reading. They are all positive and I try to incorporate at lease one into each of my character, even the villain. This is followed by a breakdown of my favorite characters good and bad traits. I underline the ones that come up the most. Then I have the same thing for real life people. The best part about this is every person gets to make their own list and write for those styles.

That’s followed by all of my characters on their own page. I have their name, book, what their goals are and what their personality is. Then I have what they want most, what they are trying to accomplish and one thing they would never say, never do, and never think. This allows me to reference my characters easily and develop their worst fears while I’m writing. I can force them to do the opposite of their goal, say something completely out of character, and display human emotion. I can also reference all my characters and make sure I’m not writing the same person twice.

The Pink Pages: Plots

I want all of my plots to be very original. Whenever I draft an idea I always write it’s tag line in the book followed by a synopsis and notes. This lets me keep everything jotted down for later so I won’t forget that story idea or reuse it. This is particularly important for me because I need to keep everything in order. It is also my bank when I’m working on a new idea. I mix and mash old thoughts together until I create the perfect plot.

The Purple Pages: Forget-me-nots

When I try to jump into a piece after a long time or I’m switching into it from another project it’s easy to forget the subtleties of each project. So I have a page dedicated to things I need to put in later, whether that is symbols, subplot, recurring images, scenes to put in or edits to make in the future, it all go’s on one page. During edits, I reference this to make sure nothing is forgotten.

I hope this can help you keep organized in some way! Have a great day.