Posted in Fiction, Just for fun, Writing

My 6 Favorite Books From Childhood

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All writers have to get their spark from somewhere. For me, it was middle school, the peak of my reading career. These are my favorite books from that time. I won’t summarise them because you can find that anywhere.

 

 

Molly Moon and the Incredible Book of Hypnotism61ps5n05iul-_sy344_bo1204203200_

You wouldn’t know how fascinating this novel and the rest of the series is by the opening pages. But once you get into the real meat of the story you’ll find an amazing world and great adventure.

Dark Life

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The world building is absolutely perfect. The twist ending made me love writing and reading. I also loved the characters and found the whole thing to be a beautiful ride.

Jake Ransom and the Skull King’s Shadow

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Talk about a page turner. When I read it I was completely pulled in by the amazing world and fast plot. There was so much going on it kept me pulled in the entire time.

Rascal

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This one’s a family favorite. We would listen to it on every road trip becue the writing is simply beautiful. It tells a fantastic story that is both funny and leaves you with a sad but satisfying ending.

Zen and the Art of Faking

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If you want to fall in love with a character pick up this book. It was packed with awesome moments that have stuck with me to this day.

 

What were your favorites?

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Posted in Publishing, Writing

Why Publishers Will Only Read Your First Page!

I have always thought it was unfair that a publisher spends so little looking at people’s novels before sending the rejection letter. But recently I was able to talk with an editor about why that is.

This is the most important thing she told me.

When a READER picks up your book, makes it past the cover and the back of the book blurb, the most they will read is a page. I was in Barnes and Noble for a few hours and picked up a few books based off of their covers. Most nonfiction got flipped to a random page and I read THREE LINES. I picked up few fiction books and read the back. I opened ONE. This is like the publisher reading your summary or Querry letter. They will be able to tell based off of that if they would open your novel.

The single book I opened didn’t even get the whole page read

In this era, we have very short attention spans. If the publisher didn’t get to the ‘best stuff’ then neither will your reader. Put your best work at the very beginning. But have hope. That one book I picked up came home with me because when I read the first half a page I decided I loved it. So when a publisher picks up your book they will read very little.

They will be able to see how much thought and editing you put in. They will see if you know how to write engaging work and know how to start a story. And most importantly they will be able to see if it’s the type of book they have been waiting for.

This summer I will be editing three novels I have been writing since 2014 and I hope to give you advice on getting published and making your book be one that people fall in love with. I hope this information was as eye-opening to you as it was to me.

Posted in Writing

What Does ‘Write What you Want to Read’ Really Mean?

I always heard the advice ‘write what you want to read’ whenever I scoured the internet for inspiration. It wasn’t until recently that I really understood what that meant. I was at a writers conference talking with a creative writing teacher and I brought up this idea to him. When I think of writing what I want to read it stressed me out because it would need to be really well done and extraordinarily interesting (I’m quite a picky reader). I could never combine all the things I like into one book. Then he told me the meaning behind that statement.

If You Don’t Write What You Want to Read You Won’t Write Well

Thus the book you write doesn’t have to be perfect, it just needs to combine your interests. I have tried to write about things I don’t like before and those parts always end up uninteresting, short, or unfinished. So for that reason, I will write what I find most interesting in this world and I there are others out there who are also looking to read it. Knowing this took a lot of stress off my shoulders when developing ideas and I hope it helps you too!

Posted in Writing

Books on Marketing your Writing and Building Your Platform

I’m currently reading two books about how to market your novel. These both mostly focus on building your platform. “Sell Your Book Like WildFire” and “Your First 1000 Copies” both have similar content but their approach is entirely different.

Your First 1000 Copies is a very fun seemingly up to date book for having been written in 2013. This focuses on taking down your fears about marketing and making connections with people.

Sell Your Book Like WildFire has a very step by step approach to keep you moving forward. To me, it seemed less up to date but was written in 2012.

Both of these books motivate me greatly and I would recommend them. I personally like ‘Your First 1000 Copies’ more because of his writing style but I can see either beeing more useful depending on the style you like the most.

If you want to see more of my book recommendations or judge me based off of my childish style find my on GoodReads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/55094969-sparren-fayne

Posted in Uncategorized

Writing characters with Dyslexia

Growing up dyslexic I can confirm that the hardest part is learning to spell dyslexia. For you writers out there, let me condense some of your research and give you a good starting point. Let’s start with the physical changes to the brain.

There are lots of different kinds of dyslexia that effect different parts of the brain. Simply put, there are the people who struggle with writing, reading, math or a combination of the three. Though the idea that the left and right parts of the brain are reserved for analytic skills and art skills respectively, the brain is wired differently for dyslexics. Information is essentially rerouted through different parts of the brain. Dyslexia is currently on the autism spectrum so that’s a good thing to research.

Trouble with reading.

Keep in mind that this is all how I experienced dyslexia. Letters are most often what we get mixed up. Specifically, “B” and “D” whose lowercase forms are almost exactly the same. For me, I only read the first 3 or so letters of a word and the guess the rest based on context. When I was young I would only read the first letter and then one letter later in the word. Another issue is word order. My eyes go faster than my brain can compute so I often read (and even type) the word that comes after the current word. For example: Are there only two cans of paint? Might turn into: Are there two cans of paint, only?

Conjunctions still tripped me up as a teenage and spell check is what taught me how to read them.

Writing with dyslexia.

In addition to the things under the reading section, there are many issues with writing. Capital letters have always confused me.  I still capitalize random letters in a sentence, usually a word I want to put emphasis on.

Where to end a sentence as well as Word order, have always Confused me.

Translation: I’ve always been confused by both word order and where to end a sentence.

The last thing is many, many spelling errors. When in dough, we spell things how they sound. Spellcheck is one of my best friends. The worst thing is when I spell a word so wrong that spell check can’t find it.

My most common errors:

Reallistic should be realistic.

Cowaparate is actually cooperate

Crismas means Christmas

Sean is supposed to be scene

Sighen should be sign

And any name presents trouble

Math. Stupid math.

I have issues with all three of these but none are quite like math. + becomes -. Dividing turns to multiplication. 1205 might be 1502. Checking each line is the only way I get anything right. I do steps out of order, my notes are messy numbers are written backward, I leave out parts of numbers. Oh, by the way, if your dyslexia is introduced to algebra, expect them to start out with y= X*2 and end up with W=z2 (not like that was even a math problem, to begin with).

Some dyslexics are amazing at math. I really like to write but can’t do math to pass a class. Adding in my head is still terribly hard. Telling time is difficult, and you better hope I have a calendar because tomorrow is Thursday the 5th and the day after that is Wednesday the 7th .

A note on our thoughts.

Being dyslexic doesn’t men were dumb, I started college at age 16. We just think differently. I wrote my first books at age six, and entirely in camera angles. Without tutoring, however, we can get the lowest grades in the class. Come up with a redeeming quirky quality for your dyslexic character. Something artsy is most realistic.

Find part 2 Here!

Or find out about things I still struggle with after years of tutoring Here.